• On Women and Leadership
  • Success Profile: Bianca Vobecky Shares Gems on the Entrepreneurial Path

    Article ImagesBianca Vobecky is the Founder and President of Vobecky Enterprises. Since its founding in 2006, Vobecky Enterprises has provided construction and construction related services to both small and large firms as well as the federal government. Vobecky Enterprises also offers trucking services to move freight to and from job sites.

    Despite the company’s success, the road to Vobecky Enterprises wasn’t a straight one for the company’s founder. Vobecky tried out numerous avenues during her time in college before discovering her passion for business.

    “I believe I’ve always been an entrepreneur,” said Vobecky, “but I just didn’t know it because I didn’t know any entrepreneurs.”

    That’s far from the case now. Vobecky has managed to cultivate many meaningful relationships that have helped and continue to help her business along the way. Vobecky is a part of a “support group” of women who meet quarterly to discuss their current business endeavors and offer each other help when necessary.

    Vobecky has also broadened her network by joining professional organizations for women, people of color and small business owners. By being a member of as well as joining the board of many such organizations, Vobecky has been able to both leverage social capital as well as motivate herself by looking to her peers.

    She also notes the importance of women of color in business not only for networking among themselves but also for future generations.

    “Seeing successful women who look like them is important for little girls of color to see that they can do it too, and it’s not something that’s reserved for a certain sector of the population,” said Vobecky. “You can absolutely follow your dreams and follow your heart, and be successful. I think it’s good for boys of color to see it also. Having a successful business woman in your family brings access to better education, pride and hope. Success is contagious.”

    Vobecky also offered advice for new entrepreneurs. She said that they should do their homework and make sure that the business licenses are in their name. She also warned that business credit cards should be used wisely and not as cash flow as debt is something to avoid.  For entrepreneurs looking to obtain capital for their companies, Vobecky advised keeping good records, finding a reputable and experienced CPA, paying their taxes and making sure that they’re making a profit before seeking out a lender.

    Vobecky is speaking from a place of experience as someone who was denied loans several times during the early days of her business. This frustrating experience taught her a valuable lesson:

    “Don’t jump when you don’t get [what you want], maybe learn and build a personal relationship,” said Vobecky.

    By doing just that Vobecky has been able to achieve much success. In 2010 and 2015 Vobecky was named Contactor of the Year by the Minority Business Development Agency and the City of Los Angeles. In 2016 she won the Minority Champion Award from the Small Business Administration. In 2017 she won the Outstanding Entrepreneur of The Year Award from the Black Business Association and the Orange County Asian Business Association. The Los Angeles Business Journal also named Vobecky Enterprises as one of the Top 100 Fastest Growing Private Companies in Los Angeles in 2017.

     

    Chantè Russell

    Chanté Russell is a Howard University print journalism major from Raleigh, North Carolina. Her entire life has been shaped by her passion for writing, fashion and activism. Those passions have led her to create a blog entitled Be The Zeitgeist and serve as a staff writer for Howard’s student newspaper, The Hilltop. She has also written for Lady With Attitude and worked as a freelance journalist. Some of her biggest role models include Anna Wintour, Maya Angelou and her cousin, Dr. Jennifer Edwards, who inspired Chanté to attend Howard. After completing college, Chanté hopes to work as a fashion journalist and use her platform to combat cultural insensitivity within the fashion industry and improve the public perception of the industry.

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